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Maquiladoras (Mexican assembly plants that absorb imported components and produce goods for export) have become the emblem of trade in Mexico. They left the United States for Mexico, hence the debate about the loss of American jobs. Revenues in the maquiladora sector had increased by 15.5% since nafta in 1994. [68] Other sectors have also benefited from the free trade agreement and the share of non-cross-border exports to the United States has increased over the past five years [when?], while the share of exports from border states has declined. This has led to rapid growth in non-cross-border metropolitan areas such as Toluca, Leén and Puebla, all more populated than Tijuana, Ciudad Juérez and Reynosa. The meat industry was one of the most affected agricultural sectors. In 2004, Mexico moved from a small player in the U.S. export market to the second largest importer of U.S. agricultural products, and NAFTA may have been an important catalyst for this change. Free trade has removed barriers to business between the two countries, allowing Mexico to offer a growing meat market in the United States and increase sales and profits for the meat industry in the United States. A simultaneous and dramatic increase in Mexican GDP per capita has significantly changed meat consumption patterns due to increased per capita meat consumption. [70] Chapter 19 of NAFTA was a trade litigation mechanism that subjects anti-dumping rules and countervailing law (AD/CVD) rules to international panel review or conventional judicial review.

[58] In the United States, for example, review of decisions by authorities imposing anti-dumping and countervailing duties is generally referred to the U.S. International Court of Commerce, a Section III court. However, the NAFTA parties were given the opportunity to appeal decisions against binational bodies made up of five citizens of the two NAFTA countries. [58] Participants were generally lawyers with experience in international commercial law. Since NAFTA did not contain physical provisions for AD/CVD, the panel was tasked with determining whether the final decisions of the agencies to which AD/CVD were parties were consistent with domestic national law. Chapter 19 was an anomaly in international dispute resolution because it did not apply international law, but required a body made up of individuals from many countries to review the application of a country`s domestic law. [Citation required] NAFTA was supplemented by two other regulations: the North American Environmental Cooperation Agreement (NAAEC) and the North American Agreement on Labour Cooperation (NAALC). These tangential agreements should prevent companies from moving to other countries in order to use lower wages, more moderate health and safety rules and more flexible environmental rules. A Chapter 19 panel should consider whether the Agency`s decision was supported by „substantial evidence.“ This standard was a considerable tribute to the national agency.

Some of the most contentious trade disputes in recent years, such as the U.S.-Canada dispute over conifers, were negotiated ahead of chapter 19 panels. The kick-off of a North American free trade area began with U.S. President Ronald Reagan, who made the idea part of his campaign by announcing his candidacy for president in November 1979. [15] Canada and the United States signed the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement in 1988, and shortly thereafter, Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari decided to address U.S. President George H.W. Bush to propose a similar agreement to make foreign investment after the Latin American debt crisis. [15] When the two leaders began negotiations, the Canadian government of Prime Minister Brian Mulroney feared that the benefits that Canada had gained through the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement would be undermined by a